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AuthorsDamon Linker

Damon Linker Books

Damon Linker is a contributing editor for the New Republic and is a Senior Writing Fellow in the Center for Critical Writing at the University of Pennsylvania. He lives in suburban Philadelphia with his wife and two children.
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The Theocons
Secular America Under Siege
Damon Linker - Sep 04, 2007 (first published in 2006)
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An essential history of the influential men who have spearheaded the movement to erode the wall separating church and state.Beginning as far-left radicals during the 1960s, the theocons in Damon Linkers book (including Richard John Neuhaus, Michael Novak, and George Weigel) gradually transitioned to conservatism when they grew frustrated with the f...
Recommended by
Steven Pinker
The Rise and Fall of Neoconservatism (Cato Unbound)
Damon Linker, C. Bradley Thompson, Patrick Deneen, Douglas Rasmussen - Mar 07, 2011
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Neoconservatism is perhaps the slipperiest of current intellectual trends. Its adherents downplay the term itself, calling neoconservatism variously a "persuasion," a "mode of thinking," or even a "mood." Our lead essayist this month begs to differ. Drawing on his recent book Neoconservatism: An Obituary for an Idea, C. Bradley Thompson claims that...
The Religious Test
Why We Must Question the Beliefs of Our Leaders
Damon Linker - Jul 20, 2010
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The Constitution states that “no religious test” may keep a candidate from aspiring to political office. Yet, since John F. Kennedy used the phrase to deflect concerns about his Catholicism, the public has largely avoided probing candidates’ religious beliefs. Is it true, however, that a candidate’s religious convictions should be off-limits to pub...
Religion and Politics, Home and Abroad (Cato Unbound)
Andrew Sullivan, Mark Lilla, Philip Jenkins, Damon Linker - Oct 08, 2007
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Americans are among the most religious people in the wealthy, democratic West. Yet we are not only comfortable, but proud, of the independence of church and state. Are we bound to fumble in our foreign policy if we cannot understand why the politics of equality, liberty, toleration, and democracy fit so uneasily with the explicitly religious politi...