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Alondra Nelson

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Alondra Nelson, an American writer and academic, is President of the Social Science Research Council. An award-winning researcher, she is also the Harold F. Linder Chair in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study.
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Life on Mars book cover
Life on Mars
Poems
Tracy K. Smith - 2011-05-10
Goodreads Rating
You lie there kicking like a baby, waiting for God himself To lift you past the rungs of your crib. What Would your life say if it could talk?                                                            —from “No Fly Zone”With allusions to David Bowie and interplanetary travel, Life on Mars imagines a soundtrack for the universe to accompany the dis...
Alondra Nelson
2020-11-24T14:40:48.000Z
A gem from one of my favorite books, Tracy K. Smith's Life on Mars      source
How Cancer Crossed the Color Line book cover
How Cancer Crossed the Color Line
Keith Wailoo - 2011-02-04
Goodreads Rating
In the course of the 20th century, cancer went from being perceived as a white woman's nemesis to a "democratic disease" to a fearsome threat in communities of color. Drawing on film and fiction, on medical and epidemiological evidence, and on patients' accounts, Keith Wailoo tracks this transformation in cancer awareness, revealing how not only aw...
Alondra Nelson
2011-05-10T02:47:13.000Z
Keith Wailoo is brilliant! Do read this book! RT @TheRoot247: The Root Recommends: How Cancer Crossed the Color Line      source
Acres of Skin book cover
Acres of Skin
Human Experiments at Holmesburg Prison
Allen M. Hornblum - 1999-04-12 (first published in 1998)
Goodreads Rating
In the first expose of unjust medical experimentation since David Rothman's Willowbrook's Wars, Allen M. Hornblum releases devastating stories from within the walls of Philadelphia's Holmesburg Prison. For more than two decades, from the mid-1950s through the mid-1970s, inmates were used, in exchange for a few dollars, as guinea pigs in a host of m...