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Branko Milanovic

economist
educator

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Branko Milanović is a Serbian-American economist. He is most known for his work on income distribution and inequality. Since January 2014, he is a visiting presidential professor at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and an affiliated senior scholar at the Luxembourg Income Study.
6 books on the list
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Forbidden Colors
Yukio Mishima - Feb 22, 1999 (first published in 1951)
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From one of Japan's greatest modern writers comes an exquisitely disturbing novel of sexual combat and concealed passion, a work that distills beauty, longing, and loathing into an intoxicating poisoned cocktail. An aging, embittered novelist sets out to avenge himself on the women who have betrayed him. He finds the perfect instrument in Yuichi, a...
Branko Milanovic
Dec 07, 2020
@Henk_Overbeek @BBC_Culture But of course, it is the book that counts; these are only details."The Sailor who Fell...", "Forbidden Colors" are also great.     source
The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea
Yukio Mishima - May 31, 1994 (first published in 1963)
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The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea tells the tale of a band of savage thirteen-year-old boys who reject the adult world as illusory, hypocritical and sentimental, and train themselves in a brutal callousness they call "objectivity." When the mother of one of them begins an affair with a ship's officer, he and his friends idealize the man a...
Branko Milanovic
Dec 07, 2020
@Henk_Overbeek @BBC_Culture But of course, it is the book that counts; these are only details."The Sailor who Fell...", "Forbidden Colors" are also great.     source
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PewDiePie
Confessions of a Mask
Yukio Mishima - Jan 17, 1958 (first published in 1949)
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Confessions of a Mask tells the story of Kochan, an adolescent boy tormented by his burgeoning attraction to men: he wants to be “normal.” Kochan is meek-bodied and unable to participate in the more athletic activities of his classmates. He begins to notice his growing attraction to some of the boys in his class, particularly the pubescent body of ...
Branko Milanovic
Dec 07, 2020
@Henk_Overbeek @BBC_Culture But of course, it is the book that counts; these are only details."The Sailor who Fell...", "Forbidden Colors" are also great.     source
The Invisible Hand?
How Market Economies have Emerged and Declined Since AD 500
Bas van Bavel - Jun 25, 2019 (first published in 2018)
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The Invisible Hand? offers a radical departure from the conventional wisdom of economists and economic historians, by showing that 'factor markets' and the economies dominated by them -- the market economies -- are not modern, but have existed at various times in the past. They rise, stagnate, and decline; and consist of very different combinations...
Branko Milanovic
Dec 02, 2020
@jamuslim @Borners1 @gorkemyurt Have a look at this great book by Bas van Bavel The Invisible Hand? He studies Iraq (the Abbasids), Italian city states, the Low Countries.     source
Garrincha
The Triumph and Tragedy of Brazil's Forgotten Footballing Hero by RUY CASTRO (2004-08-01)
Jan 01, 1682
Branko Milanovic
Nov 29, 2020
@ananias_1979 Agree. Ruy Castro's book on Garrincha is just beautiful.     source
The Meritocracy Trap
How America's Foundational Myth Feeds Inequality, Dismantles the Middle Class, and Devours the Elite
Daniel Markovits - Sep 10, 2019
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A revolutionary new argument from eminent Yale Law professor Daniel Markovits attacking the false promise of meritocracy It is an axiom of American life that advantage should be earned through ability and effort. Even as the country divides itself at every turn, the meritocratic ideal - that social and economic rewards should follow achievement ra...
Branko Milanovic
Oct 21, 2020
If this is not clear from my review: Yes, I liked the book very much. It is one of these books that can change both how we view meritocracy and influence policy. D Markovits, "The meritocracy trap"     source
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Fareed Zakaria