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Jacquelyn Gill

scientist

Recommended Books

Jacquelyn Gill is a paleoecologist and Assistant Professor of climate science at the University of Maine.
7 books on the list
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A Terrible Thing to Waste
Environmental Racism and Its Assault on the American Mind
Harriet A. Washington - Jul 23, 2019
Goodreads Rating
A "powerful and indispensable book" on the devastating consequences of environmental racism--and what we can do to remedy its toxic effects on marginalized communities.Did you know...Middle-class African-American households with incomes between $50,000 and $60,000 live in neighborhoods that are more polluted than those of very poor white households...
Jacquelyn Gill
Jul 22, 2020
@SeanEngel The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a good book. See also: The Tuskeegee experiments, Project Paperclip, environmental racism, eugenics.     source
Operation Paperclip
The Secret Intelligence Program that Brought Nazi Scientists to America
Annie Jacobsen - Jan 20, 2015 (first published in 2014)
Goodreads Rating
The explosive story of America's secret post-WWII science programs, from the author of the New York Times bestseller Area 51In the chaos following World War II, the U.S. government faced many difficult decisions, including what to do with the Third Reich's scientific minds. These were the brains behind the Nazis' once-indomitable war machine. So be...
Jacquelyn Gill
Jul 22, 2020
@SeanEngel The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a good book. See also: The Tuskeegee experiments, Project Paperclip, environmental racism, eugenics.     source
War Against the Weak
Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create a Master Race, Expanded Edition
Edwin Black - Apr 30, 2012 (first published in 2003)
Goodreads Rating
War Against the Weak is the gripping chronicle documenting how American corporate philanthropies launched a national campaign of ethnic cleansing in the United States, helped found and fund the Nazi eugenics of Hitler and Mengele and then created the modern movement of "human genetics." Some 60,000 Americans were sterilized under laws in 27 states....
Jacquelyn Gill
Jul 22, 2020
@SeanEngel The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a good book. See also: The Tuskeegee experiments, Project Paperclip, environmental racism, eugenics.     source
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Rebecca Skloot - Mar 07, 2011
Goodreads Rating
Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor black tobacco farmer whose cells--taken without her knowledge in 1951--became one of the most important tools in medicine, vital for developing the polio vaccine, cloning, gene mapping, and more. Henrietta's cells have been bought and sold by the billions, yes she remains...
Jacquelyn Gill
Jul 22, 2020
@SeanEngel The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a good book. See also: The Tuskeegee experiments, Project Paperclip, environmental racism, eugenics.     source
Also recommended by
A.J. Jacobs
Bad Blood
The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment, New and Expanded Edition
James H. Jones - Jan 15, 1993 (first published in 1981)
Goodreads Rating
From 1932 to 1972, the United States Public Health Service conducted a non-therapeutic experiment involving over 400 black male sharecroppers infected with syphilis. The Tuskegee Study had nothing to do with treatment. Its purpose was to trace the spontaneous evolution of the disease in order to learn how syphilis affected black subjects.The men we...
Jacquelyn Gill
Jul 22, 2020
@SeanEngel The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is a good book. See also: The Tuskeegee experiments, Project Paperclip, environmental racism, eugenics.     source
The Scientist's Guide to Writing
How to Write More Easily and Effectively throughout Your Scientific Career
Stephen B. Heard - Apr 12, 2016
Goodreads Rating
A concise and accessible primer on the scientific writer's craftThe ability to write clearly is critical to any scientific career. The Scientist's Guide to Writing provides practical advice to help scientists become more effective writers so that their ideas have the greatest possible impact.Drawing on his own experience as a scientist, graduate ad...
Jacquelyn Gill
Jan 09, 2020
@GreenspaceGirl @StephenBHeard As a historian, I also think you'll enjoy his book, which includes a history of scientific writing.     source
How to Clone a Mammoth
The Science of De-Extinction
Beth Shapiro - Sep 19, 2016 (first published in 2015)
Goodreads Rating
An insider's view on bringing extinct species back to lifeCould extinct species, like mammoths and passenger pigeons, be brought back to life? The science says yes. In How to Clone a Mammoth, Beth Shapiro, evolutionary biologist and pioneer in ancient DNA research, walks readers through the astonishing and controversial process of de-extinction. Fr...
Jacquelyn Gill
Jul 23, 2019
Our ancient DNA collaborator is @bonesandbugs, who will be helping to train us in how to analyze the DNA of ancient plants from sediment cores and coprolites (to reconstruct ancient animal diets). You may know her from her awesome book:     source