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Sebastian Junger

author
journalist

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Sebastian Junger is an American journalist, author and filmmaker. He is noted for his book The Perfect Storm: A True Story of Men Against the Sea, a creative nonfiction work which became a bestseller; and for his documentary films Restrepo and Korengal, which won awards.
7 books on the list
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What We Inherit
A Secret War and a Family's Search for Answers
Jessica Pearce Rotondi - Apr 21, 2020
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In the wake of her mother’s death, Jessica Pearce Rotondi uncovers boxes of letters, declassified CIA reports, and newspaper clippings that bring to light a family ghost: her uncle Jack, who disappeared during the CIA-led Secret War in Laos in 1972. The letters lead her across Southeast Asia in search of the truth that has eluded her family for dec...
Sebastian Junger
Apr 25, 2020
hey everyone, this is a pretty incredible book by an amazing young writer about her search for a relative who was shot down in Vietnam and never found. I highly recommend it...      source
Thieves of State
Why Corruption Threatens Global Security
Sarah Chayes - Mar 07, 2016 (first published in 2015)
Goodreads Rating
The world is blowing up. Every day a new blaze seems to ignite: the bloody implosion of Iraq and Syria; the East-West standoff in Ukraine; abducted schoolgirls in Nigeria. Is there some thread tying these frightening international security crises together? In a riveting account that weaves history with fast-moving reportage and insider accounts fro...
Sebastian Junger
Jun 05, 2016
Chayes' thesis here is both radical and incredibly obvious: Corruption is the common denominator among societies where radical Islam is ascendant. ISIS, the Taliban, Somalia's al-Shabab, and Nigeria's Boko Haram all gained footholds, we're told, because they promised to eradicate the corruption of despotic regimes. If this is so, corruption should be our target, too.      source
Empire of the Summer Moon
Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History
S. C. Gwynne - May 25, 2010
Goodreads Rating
In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all.S. C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise...
Sebastian Junger
Jun 05, 2016
This book recounts how the Comanche, through extraordinary fighting and survival skills, succeeded longer than any other Native American group in blocking white society's intrusion on their land. Central to the story is Quanah Parker, a mixed-race war leader whose white mother was captured by the Comanche as a teenager.      source
Radical Hope
Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation
Jonathan Lear - Apr 30, 2008 (first published in 2006)
Goodreads Rating
Shortly before he died, Plenty Coups, the last great Chief of the Crow Nation, told his story—up to a certain point. “When the buffalo went away the hearts of my people fell to the ground,” he said, “and they could not lift them up again. After this nothing happened.” It is precisely this point—that of a people faced with the end of their way of li...
Sebastian Junger
Jun 05, 2016
How does a society survive the complete collapse of its economic and ethical systems? Lear, a philosopher and historian, explains how the radical vision of Chief Plenty Coups saved his fellow Crow from physical and spiritual annihilation in the 1870s. This is one of the most profound and exciting books I have ever read.      source
Suttree
Cormac McCarthy - May 05, 1992 (first published in 1979)
Goodreads Rating
This compelling novel has as its protagonist Cornelius Suttree, living alone and in exile in a disintegrating houseboat on the wrong side of the Tennessee River close by Knoxville. He stays at the edge of an outcast community inhabited by eccentrics, criminals and the poverty-stricken. Rising above the physical and human squalor around him, his det...
Sebastian Junger
Jun 05, 2016
A former professor living on a Tennessee River houseboat ekes out a livelihood selling his catch, then drinks away his profits with Knoxville's misfits and miscreants. McCarthy's prose is ancient and exact and mythic, and his portrait of America's underbelly in the 1950s is shocking in its depiction of human degradation.      source
Sapiens
A Brief History of Humankind
Yuval Noah Harari - May 15, 2018 (first published in 2011)
Goodreads Rating
100,000 years ago, at least six human species inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations and human rights; to trust money, books and laws; and to be ens...
Sebastian Junger
I’m going to give Sapiens over and over again to everyone I know.      source
At Play in the Fields of the Lord
Peter Matthiessen - Dec 03, 1991 (first published in 1965)
Goodreads Rating
In a malarial outpost in the South American rain forest, two misplaced gringos converge and clash. Martin Quarrier has come to convert the fearful and elusive Niaruna Indians to his brand of Christianity. Lewis Moon, a stateless mercenary who is himself part Indian, has come to kill them on behalf of the local comandante.Out of their struggle Peter...
Sebastian Junger
The book that I have given to others most often as a gift.      source