Search for books, people and lists
Read This Twice
HomePeopleBooksSign In

David Heinemeier Hansson

engineer
entrepreneur

Recommended Books

David Heinemeier Hansson is a Danish programmer, racing driver and the creator of the popular Ruby on Rails web development framework and the Instiki wiki. He is also a partner at the web-based software development firm Basecamp.
50 books on the list
Sort by
Latest Recommendations First
Layout
Goliath
The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy
Matt Stoller - Oct 06, 2020 (first published in 2019)
Goodreads Rating
“Every thinking American must read” (The Washington Book Review) this startling and “insightful” (The New York Times) look at how concentrated financial power and consumerism has transformed American politics, and business.Going back to our country’s founding, Americans once had a coherent and clear understanding of political tyranny, one crafted b...
David Heinemeier Hansson
Jan 31, 2021
@janmikula We don’t have to invent an antitrust regime in a Twitter thread. This is a very well-documented and researched problem. Start with this book to understand its history and what remedies that have worked in the past.      source
Hate, Inc.
Why Today’s Media Makes Us Despise One Another
Matt Taibbi - Apr 13, 2021 (first published in 2019)
Goodreads Rating
In this characteristically turbocharged new book, celebrated Rolling Stone journalist Matt Taibbi provides an insider's guide to the variety of ways today's mainstream media tells us lies. Part tirade, part confessional, it reveals that what most people think of as "the news" is, in fact, a twisted wing of the entertainment business.In the Internet...
David Heinemeier Hansson
Jan 12, 2021
Apropos everything, you should read @mtaibbi's Hate Inc book for a good historical summary of media delusions, malpractice, and ill intent from the Iraq War through the financial crisis through Russiagate. Could scarcely be more relevant than right now.      source
The Management Myth
Debunking Modern Business Philosophy
Matthew Stewart - Aug 16, 2010 (first published in 2009)
Goodreads Rating
Fresh from Oxford with a degree in philosophy and no particular interest in business, Matthew Stewart might not have seemed a likely candidate to become a consultant. But soon he was telling veteran managers how to run their companies.In narrating his own ill-fated (and often hilarious) odyssey at a top-tier firm, Stewart turns the consultants merc...
David Heinemeier Hansson
Nov 25, 2020
This reminded me that I needed to recommend the fantastic book The Management Myth by Matthew Stewart. In it, you get the bullshit history of Scientific Management, along with an exposé on just the kind of fraud that its popularizer, F. Winslow Taylor.      source
When Prophecy Fails
Leon Festinger - Apr 03, 2018 (first published in 1956)
Goodreads Rating
The study reported in this volume grew out of some theoretical work, one phase of which bore specifically on the behavior of individuals in social movements that made specific (and unfulfilled) prophecies. We had been forced to depend chiefly on historical records to judge the adequacy of our theoretical ideas until we by chance discovered the soci...
David Heinemeier Hansson
Jul 09, 2020
The 1964 book When Prophecy Fails covers this phenomenon in detail: Once a person has been ensnared by a false in-group belief, disconfirmation in the form of facts or events, often lead to more fervent beliefs.      source
Also recommended by
Ben Collins
The Road to Wigan Pier
George Orwell - Jun 28, 2008 (first published in 1937)
Goodreads Rating
The Road to Wigan Pier authored by George Orwell (Eric Arthur Blair) was an autobiographical novel by the author written in those days of his life that we say struggling days. He was moving around from one city to the other and it were those days when he left his job at the Booklovers' Corner. A photograph taken by the esteemed photographer 'Ceridw...
David Heinemeier Hansson
Mar 24, 2020
Been reading Orwell’s Road to Wigan Pier, and it’s amazing how much of the abusive ideology revealed in his account of the miners is still present in today’s gig economy. Paying for your own equipment (lamps v cars), no compensation for travel (in mine v between passengers).      source
Also recommended by
Jordan Peterson
The Divide
Global Inequality from Conquest to Free Markets
Jason Hickel - Feb 13, 2018 (first published in 2017)
Goodreads Rating
More than four billion people—some 60 percent of humanity—live in debilitating poverty, on less than $5 per day. The standard narrative tells us this crisis is a natural phenomenon, having to do with things like climate and geography and culture. It tells us that all we have to do is give a bit of aid here and there to help poor countries up the de...
David Heinemeier Hansson
Aug 31, 2019
I implore you to read this book. It’s like opening your eyes after getting unplugged from the matrix. It’s bright and jarring at first, but you’ll want to know.      source
Also recommended by
Aaron Bastani
Bad Blood
Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup
John Carreyrou - Jan 28, 2020 (first published in 2018)
Goodreads Rating
In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the next Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with its breakthrough device, which performed the whole range of laboratory tests from a single drop of blood. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Ti...
David Heinemeier Hansson
Jul 22, 2018
The book “Bad Blood”, about the Theranos fraud, is an indictment not just of Holmes and her co-conspirators, but Silicon Valley culture as a whole. All its worst stereotypes and tendencies animated by dislikable characters. Recommended reading!      source
Why We Sleep
Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams
Matthew Walker - Jun 19, 2018 (first published in 2017)
Goodreads Rating
“Why We Sleep is an important and fascinating book…Walker taught me a lot about this basic activity that every person on Earth needs. I suspect his book will do the same for you.” —Bill Gates A New York Times bestseller and international sensation, this “stimulating and important book” (Financial Times) is a fascinating dive into the purpose and po...
David Heinemeier Hansson
Jun 24, 2018
@noahkrueger @brittballard Check the Why We Sleep book.      source
The Trial
Franz Kafka - Oct 06, 2020 (first published in 1925)
Goodreads Rating
Written in 1914 but not published until 1925, a year after Kafka’s death, The Trial is the terrifying tale of Josef K., a respectable bank officer who is suddenly and inexplicably arrested and must defend himself against a charge about which he can get no information. Whether read as an existential tale, a parable, or a prophecy of the excesses of ...
David Heinemeier Hansson
May 31, 2018
Five novels I think about all the time - 1984: States crave control - The Trial: Bureaucracies eats people - The Stranger: Alienation is a vantage point - Animal Farm: Revolutions usually corrupt - Brave New World: Caste systems fence morality      source
Also recommended by
Kara SwisherSusan J. Fowler
Brave New World
Aldous Huxley - May 09, 2017 (first published in 1932)
Goodreads Rating
Brave New World is a dystopian novel by English author Aldous Huxley, written in 1931 and published in 1932. Largely set in a futuristic World State, inhabited by genetically modified citizens and an intelligence-based social hierarchy, the novel anticipates huge scientific advancements in reproductive technology, sleep-learning, psychological mani...
David Heinemeier Hansson
May 31, 2018
Five novels I think about all the time - 1984: States crave control - The Trial: Bureaucracies eats people - The Stranger: Alienation is a vantage point - Animal Farm: Revolutions usually corrupt - Brave New World: Caste systems fence morality      source
1984
George Orwell - Apr 04, 2017 (first published in 1949)
Goodreads Rating
Among the seminal texts of the 20th century, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a rare work that grows more haunting as its futuristic purgatory becomes more real. Published in 1949, the book offers political satirist George Orwell's nightmarish vision of a totalitarian, bureaucratic world and one poor stiff's attempt to find individuality. The brilliance of ...
David Heinemeier Hansson
May 31, 2018
Five novels I think about all the time - 1984: States crave control - The Trial: Bureaucracies eats people - The Stranger: Alienation is a vantage point - Animal Farm: Revolutions usually corrupt - Brave New World: Caste systems fence morality      source
The Stranger by Albert Camus
On the Shortness of Life by Seneca
Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl
Finding Flow by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
The Wealth Of Nations by Adam Smith
Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty
Political Order and Political Decay by Francis Fukuyama
The Origins of Political Order by Francis Fukuyama
Debt by
Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim
Drive by Daniel H. Pink
The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham
The Effective Executive by Peter F. Drucker
Maverick by Ricardo Semler
The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis
The Halo Effect by Phil Rosenzweig
An Introduction to General Systems Thinking by Gerald M. Weinberg
The New Tsar by Steven Lee Myers
The Myth of the Spoiled Child by Alfie Kohn
A Guide to the Good Life by William B. Irvine
Refactoring by Martin Fowler
On Writing Well by William Zinsser
Domain-Driven Design by Eric Evans
Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture by Martin Fowler
The Elements of Style by William Strunk Jr.
Smalltalk Best Practice Patterns by Kent Beck
Are Your Lights On? by Donald C. Gause
Turn the Ship Around! by L. David Marquet
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
How to Change Your Mind by Michael Pollan
The Manual by Epictetus
The Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday
Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson
The Big Short by Michael Lewis
The 4-Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss
Anxiety Culture by Michael Foley
Fear and Trembling by Soren Kierkegaard
Punished by Rewards by Alfie Kohn
Escape from Freedom by Erich Fromm